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When a loved one has a drink problem

Loved oneDrinking problem

If someone you love has a drinking problem, you may be struggling with a number of painful emotions, including shame, fear, anger, and self-blame. The problem may be so overwhelming that it seems easier to ignore it and pretend that nothing is wrong. But you know that something is wrong, and in the long run, denying it will be more damaging to you, other family members, and the alcoholic.

What not to do

Source: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol & Drug Information

Self care

Dealing with a loved one’s alcohol problem can be an emotional rollercoaster. It’s vital that you take care of yourself and get the support you need. Having people you can talk honestly and openly with about what you’re going through is important.

A good place to start is by joining a group such as Al-Anon, a free peer support group for families coping with alcohol dependency. Listening to others with the same challenges can be a tremendous source of comfort and support. You can also turn to trusted friends, a therapist, or other resources in your community.

Admitting that there’s a serious problem can be painful for the whole family, not just the alcohol dependent person. But don’t be ashamed. You’re not alone. Alcohol dependency affects millions of families, from every social class, race, and culture. But there is help and support available for both you and your loved one.

Find a local service that can help

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